Tag Archives: literature

Blood Diamond

 “The Moonstone” is a novel that after it is read, still seems impossible to write. First, there is the simple anomaly that “The Moonstone,” a detective fiction, not only resists the temptation to be read once and shelved after the … Continue reading

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Flann O’Brien’s “The Various Lives Of Keats And Chapman (Including ‘The Brother’)”

The relationship between Flann O’Brien (also Brian O’Nolan, also Myles na Gopaleen) to the other canonical Irish writers of the twentieth century: Yeats, Joyce, and Beckett, is a tricky one. For the average reader, that is the reader who was … Continue reading

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George Bernard Shaw’s “Love Among The Artists”

Several months ago, my friend and I visited a local used bookstore. Among the gems that I collected were a short story collection by Aleister Crowley (a superstitious sort, I have not and do not intend to open the pages … Continue reading

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An Unthinkable Existence: David Levithan’s “Every Day”

In writing, love is cruel. It is stitched together with “yeses” and “nos” and is built from the bottom up with pieces that cannot not synchronize; that is, with bits that refuse to fit to form. What is a love story without … Continue reading

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Honore de Balzac’s “Seraphita”

Where does one even begin when diving into one of the 19th century’s greatest literary composers? Honore de Balzac, with his prestigious name and astounding literary oeuvre, certainly does not make the task easy: that being said, simply choosing a … Continue reading

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Paul Auster’s “The New York Trilogy”

“Whether it might have turned out differently, or whether it was all predetermined…is not the question. The question is the story itself, and whether or not it means something is not for the story to tell.” Such are the words … Continue reading

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Do Politics Ruin Poetry?

On Sunday, January 20, 2013, Richard Blanco, an openly gay Latino immigrant, delivered Barack Obama’s inauguration poem: “One Today.” It was called a “fine example of public poetry” by Entertainment Weekly, alongside the attributive adjectives “humble” and “modest.” (Although The … Continue reading

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